Welcome Login

For current information from GSA about COVID19 please click HERE

You are here

Exploring OASIS: OASIS Pools

Hello Industry Community! The OASIS Draft RFPs have been released for feedback and as part of our Exploring OASIS series regarding the development of those draft RFPs, we present the background and rationale behind the OASIS Pool system.

 

Previously here on Interact, we conducted extensive discussion regarding the selection of a proper NAICS code for the OASIS program.  That discussion was based on the current federal contracting rules that require IDIQ contracts to select a single NAICS code to represent the contract and that NAICS code establishes the size standard for the contract.

 

The Small Business Administration (SBA), however, has indicated that they intend to issue a ruling to the Code of Federal Regulation that will change the federal contracting rules on this matter. The full text of the proposed rule can be found here:

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-05-16/html/2012-11317.htm

Basically, the SBA felt that due to the rise of task order contracting, they could better ensure proper small business credit through a proposed rule which would  require broad master IDIQ contracts like OASIS to identify multiple NAICS codes and establish “sectors” for each NAICS code.  The intent of the new rule is to make sure that Small Business credit for task orders is based upon the appropriate size standard for the work being performed at the task order level.

While this is not a final rule, the OASIS team saw several benefits in the concept.  Therefore, in the draft RFP we have provided for  “Pools” under OASIS and OASIS SB that are based solely upon size standards.  The OASIS contracts span many of the NAICS codes in the 54xx NAICS family.  For the entire 54xx NAICS family, there are 7 different size standards.  We feel that work to be performed under the OASIS contracts could potentially fall into 6 of those size standards.  Accordingly, the OASIS contracts have established a Pool for each size standard with specific NAICS codes associated with each Pool.  Ordering Contracting Officers (OCO) shall select a NAICS code for each task order and that NAICS code selection shall determine which OASIS pool competes for the task order award.

 

While this does add some administrative burden for GSA, we see some significant benefits for the federal agencies and for the small business community.  In drafting this approach, we don’t want to require any additional work of you in preparing your proposal.   As it is drawn in the draft RFP, l simply indicate which Pools they qualify for and wish to compete for on the cover letter of their proposal.  Offers will be scored and sorted within each Pool for evaluation and the top 40 evaluated Offerors within each Pool will then be able to compete within that Pool after award.  Offerors may compete for any and all Pools they qualify for and desire to compete for.  OASIS award documents will identify all awarded Pools for each successful Offeror under one single OASIS contract award document.

Although the OASIS Pools are not separate contracts, for the purposes of understanding how they work, it may help to think of them as such.  Let’s examine a few hypothetical examples to clarify:

 

Example 1:

 

Company A with $10M in annual revenues (and 100 employees) meets the pass/fails of OASIS SB and qualifies for all 6 pools.  The company indicates that they would like to compete for all 6 Pools.  Evaluations are conducted and the company scores 4,600.  This score results in the following rankings within each Pool:

                                                                   

Pool 1:  35th

Pool 2:  49th

Pool 3:  63rd

Pool 4:  70th

Pool 5:  85th

Pool 6:  90th

 

In this example, Company A would receive an award on OASIS SB and be able to compete for all competitions that take place in Pool 1.  Company A would not be able to compete for any competitions that take place in Pools 2 – 6.  However, the scoring system will remain the same for the life of OASIS, and the lowest qualifying score for each OASIS and OASIS SB Pool will be made public information.  This is a unique and powerful feature of the OASIS program, because while Company A’s original award was for Pool 1 only, Company A would be armed with the knowledge of how many points they must add in order to be qualified to on-ramp into Pools 2 – 6.  Additionally, Company A, as well as all OASIS SB awardees, would be armed with the knowledge of the pass/fails, scoring system, and minimum score required to on-ramp onto OASIS in the event they outgrow their size standard as well as have at least 5 years to reach that level (size recertification occurs at the 5 year point).

 

Example 2:

 

Company B with $17M in annual revenues (and 200 employees) meets the pass/fails of OASIS SB and qualifies for 5 of the 6 pools based upon size standard.  The company indicates that they would like to compete for all 5 Pools that they are eligible for.  Evaluations are conducted and the company scores 4,900.  This score results in the following rankings within each Pool:

                                                                   

Pool 1:  N/A

Pool 2:  12th

Pool 3:  33rd

Pool 4:  54th

Pool 5:  75th

Pool 6:  80th

 

In this example, Company B would receive an award on OASIS SB and be able to compete for all competitions that take place in Pools 2 and 3.  Company B would not be able to compete for any competitions that take place in Pools 1, or 4 – 6.  Again, on-ramping into other OASIS SB Pools, as well as on-ramping onto the OASIS contract, are still future possibilities.

 

Example 3:

 

Company C with $100M in annual revenues (and 3,000 employees) meets the pass/fails of OASIS.  The company indicates that they would like to compete for all 6 OASIS Pools.  Evaluations are conducted and the company scores 5,100.  This score results in the following rankings within each Pool:

                                                                   

Pool 1:  41st

Pool 2:  43rd

Pool 3:  50th

Pool 4:  55th

Pool 5:  60th

Pool 6:  65th

 

In this example, Company C would not receive an award on OASIS and would not be able to compete for any competitions that take place in OASIS Pools 1 - 6.  However, the company is very close to qualifying for Pools 1, 2, and possibly even Pool 3.  Instead of just being closed out of OASIS forever, Company C knows how many points to go earn and add to their score in order to get on-ramped into the various OASIS Pools.  On-ramping can occur for any number of reasons, so Company C may be on-ramped onto OASIS in the future.

 

Example 4:

 

Company D with $100M in annual revenues (and 3,000 employees) meets the pass/fails of OASIS.  The company indicates that they would like to compete for all 6 OASIS Pools.  Evaluations are conducted and the company scores 5,700.  This score results in the following rankings within each Pool:

                                                                   

Pool 1:  25th

Pool 2:  26th

Pool 3:  33rd

Pool 4:  34th

Pool 5:  35th

Pool 6:  36th

 

In this example, Company D would receive an award on OASIS and be able to compete for all competitions that take place in Pools 1 - 6.

 

In summary, the OASIS team feels that this Pool concept is an innovative approach.  At this point we don’t know what will happen in the rulemaking process.  But, we believe that the concept, as we have defined it, is a win-win-win scenario for Industry, Government Clients, and GSA alike and, as a result, a big win for the American taxpayer as well.

We’d welcome your thoughts on this.   Do you agree, or do you think we’ve missed the mark?

 

At a minimum, our hope in these blogs is that we shed some light on the subject and provided greater understanding.

Jim

741
Groups audience: 
Share

Views: 1807

Comments

ClayHagan
<p>Will a Small Business awarded in <strong>OASIS SB</strong> Pool&nbsp;3 only be allowed to bid on Task Orders released on <strong>OASIS </strong>under Pool 3?&nbsp; By winning the Pool 3 <strong>OASIS SB </strong>the company has already been&nbsp;proven capable of priming work within the NAICS work spaces.&nbsp; While it may seem rare that the SB would win in the Full &amp; Open competition, it would certainly significantly aide the SB in preparing to graduate into Full &amp; Open if it experiences the competition level of Pool 3 Full &amp; Open.</p>
OASIS Blogger
<p>No.&nbsp; Ordering offices make the determination to set aside or not set aside during their acquistion planning and that guides their choice of contract.&nbsp; We have received a tremendous amount of feedback from both small businesses and large businesses that they prefer this arrangement and we have also seen that it is successful in surpassing small business utilization goals.&nbsp; Jim</p>
toby.heffernan
<p>Are the number of contractors awarded under one of the pools a zero sum game if/when GSA decides to on ramp contractors?&nbsp; So for every contractor added to&nbsp;the pool must another contractor in the pool get out?&nbsp; If that is the case does the zero sum game apply if/when a small business graduates from OASIS SB to unrestricted OASIS?</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>
OASIS Blogger
<p><b id="internal-source-marker_0.4109741321299225" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial; background-color: transparent; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">No. &nbsp;The number of contractors within a Pool is not a zero sum game. &nbsp;If companies leave a pool, we intend to replace them, but we may add additional contractors to a given pool in response to competition levels or any other situation. &nbsp;The number of initial awards does not limit the number of Contractors within a Pool in the future. &nbsp;For example, say OASIS Pool 1 has exactly 40 Contractors. &nbsp;If an OASIS SB contractor in OASIS SB Pool 1 outgrows their SB size standard, meets all of the pass/fails of OASIS, and can generate an OASIS score equal to or better than the lowest OASIS Pool 1 contract holder, that former SB Contractor will be on-ramped to OASIS Pool 1 and the total number of Contractors in OASIS Pool 1 will then be 41. &nbsp;Another example: &nbsp;One year after award, OASIS Pool 3 is averaging 2.5 proposals per solicitation, which is below the competition level desired for the OASIS contract. &nbsp;The OASIS CO may decide to add 5 additional contractors to OASIS Pool 3 in order to try to boost competition levels. &nbsp;In this case, the solicitation would be reopened and new Offerors would submit proposals that would have to meet all of the pass/fail evaluation criteria and score at least as high as the 45th ranked proposal from the initial competition did. &nbsp;The top 5 new Offerors would be selected and the total number of Contractors in OASIS Pool 3 would then be 45. &nbsp;Jim</span></b></p>
PMenard
<p>Jim,</p><p>Thanks for the open communication and request for comments. I thought I originally understood the Pool concept, but now with the examples, I am confused on how they will be utilized. In example 4, how would a company with $100M in Revenue, qualify for Pools 1, 2, or 3 when the NAICS code size standards are based on the trailing 3 years average revenue? Even in an extreme case where the company in Example 4 had $0 revenue in years 1 and 2 (not likely), a 3 year average would be over $33M a year, therefore make them not eligible for Pools 1 &amp; 2 (and realistically Pool 3).</p><p>thanks</p>
OASIS Blogger
<p><b id="internal-source-marker_0.4109741321299225" style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial; background-color: transparent; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Hi and thanks for the question. &nbsp;Please note that Example 4 concerns OASIS and not OASIS SB.</span><span style="font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial; background-color: transparent; font-weight: bold; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;"> &nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial; background-color: transparent; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">That should help clear things up. &nbsp;Jim</span></b></p>
PMenard
<p>Do the Pools not apply to OASIS? It appears (in section H.4.2.1) that the OASIS has the same Pools size standards as OASIS SB. Based on the information in the OASIS unrestricted DRFP, the firm in Example #4 would not qualify for multiple pools.</p>
OASIS Blogger
<p dir="ltr" id="internal-source-marker_0.28478237213243585" style="line-height:1.15;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;">The Pools do apply to OASIS. &nbsp;OASIS SB is a 100% Small Business Set-Aside contract. &nbsp;Therefore, on OASIS SB, we are going to restrict awards to companies that qualify as Small in each Pool based on the relevant size standard. &nbsp;However, OASIS is not a Set-Aside. &nbsp;Companies may apply for any Pool on OASIS they desire to compete for. &nbsp;We will award to the Top 40 in each Pool regardless of business size. &nbsp;Awards within pools on OASIS will not be set aside for small businesses.<br />Jim</span><br />&nbsp;</p>
Welcome to the One Acquisition Solution for Integrated Services Community; a forum to connect GSA’s industry partners and the federal acquisition... More

Interested in reading and reviewing OASIS pre-decisional and market research info? Click here for archived content.

  • annietran's picture
    annietran
  • katrinanmcdow's picture
    katrinanmcdow
  • kenneth.harry's picture
    kenneth.harry